Just 1 in 5 Americans see Ukraine as ‘ally’ – poll

Just 1 in 5 Americans see Ukraine as ‘ally’ – poll

Only 20% of Americans consider Ukraine to be a proper ally, a new poll has shown, despite the fact that more than two-thirds see it as a friendly nation. The Eastern European country has called on Washington to provide it with more support in the ongoing standoff with Russia.

The survey, which was conducted earlier this month by research agency Morning Consult and US news site Politico, set out to determine the thoughts of American voters about various foreign nations, as well as President Joe Biden’s response to the tense situation in Europe.

Out of the 2,005 respondents, one in five saw Ukraine as an “ally” to Washington, while only 3% viewed Russia in the same light. Just over two-thirds (36%) said Kiev is a friendly partner, and only 10% felt the same way about Moscow.

Russia is seen as an “enemy” by almost half of those polled (49%) in comparison to 5% who view Ukraine as a foe to the US.

Asked whether NATO should agree to the Kremlin’s demands not to admit Ukraine into the US-led military bloc, 17% said the organization should agree in order “to prevent” an invasion. However, almost half (49%) believe that no deal should be made to block Ukraine’s membership as part of efforts to thwart a conflict.

Around three in five (58%) supported NATO’s position on allowing countries such as Ukraine to apply for membership in contrast to 15% who objected.

Americans appeared fairly split on Biden’s handling of the current tensions between the two former Soviet republics, with 40% of respondents condemning his foreign policy approach, and 39% expressing approval. Almost two-thirds (63%) supported imposing harsh sanctions on Moscow as a way of preventing its troops from staging an incursion into its neighbor.

The poll comes as Western leaders repeatedly raise the alarm, claiming Moscow could be planning an invasion of Ukraine, and have pointed to reports of Russian forces amassing at the border. Last month, Biden threatened to slap Russian President Vladimir Putin with sanctions like “he’s never seen before” if an offensive is ordered, despite the Kremlin repeatedly insisting it has no aggressive intentions.

Instead, Moscow has looked to obtain security guarantees from the West that would prevent NATO’s eastward expansion, place restrictions on missile placement, and end the presence of the bloc’s troops within the borders of former Warsaw Pact countries.

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